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Barn Manager: How to Create a “Living Jump” at Your Farm

See the original publication on the BarnManager Blog.


BarnManager is thrilled to welcome environmental non-profit group Green is the New Blue to shed some light on sustainability in the equestrian world. Green is the New Blue is an environmental non-profit that strives to reduce the environmental impacts of equine related events and activities. The organization encourages others to incorporate green practices into daily operations both at horse shows and at home.


GINTB has two simple goals: to educate the equine industry about best practices for sustainability and ecological safety, and to provide the tools to make these changes easy and straight-forward to implement.


Founded by amateur rider Stephanie Bulger when she realized the detrimental impact horse events and venues had on the environment, GITNB is dedicated to reducing the environmental impact of horse shows and inspiring equestrians to do their part to live sustainably.

Look out for future pieces from Green Is the New Blue as we update you on more ways to go green in your barn!


How to create your living jump:

Green Is the New Blue has developed the concept of a “Living Jump” to promote biodiversity and support species that enhance ecosystem resilience. To build a Living Jump at your facility, all you need to do is source plants from a local nursery using native species that support pollinators and create habitats for other insects, such as ladybugs. Check out the steps below to see how to build your biodiverse jump course!


Biodiversity describes the overall variety of living things in the ecosystem, from microorganisms, to plants, to horses and their riders. Biodiversity is important because it provides us with vital resources such as food, water, shelter, medicine, and fuel. A biodiverse environment is also more resilient in the face of disaster. When equestrians source native plants within the course design and farm landscaping processes, they help to sustain local environments that, in turn, sustain human life.